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South Florida Business Dispute Attorney

| January 20, 2020

Understanding Fort Lauderdale Business Disputes

A business dispute is a disagreement that occurs between two businesses over an agreement that is signed by both parties. These types of disagreements can happen in virtually any type of business arrangement and are likely during a company’s lifetime.

The most common type of contract disputes occurs between a business and certain contractors, clients or suppliers or among business partners. This usually occurs when one of the parties has paid money for a service or good, or the timeframe for delivery of the good or service was not executed in accordance with the original agreement.

This is more likely to occur when a specific product does not meet stipulations made in the warranty or harms the consumer. A business dispute may also arise between current, former or potential employees and employers. If an employee is harassed or threatened by a company, they may have a right to file a claim against them.

Avoiding Business Disputes

No business can be completely immune to business claims, but taking preventative measures can significantly reduce the risk of these disputes happening. The following are some ways to help limit the chances of a business dispute against your company.

  • Identify all potential product hazards and clearly label the product with warnings so customers cannot say they were not aware of any dangers.
  • Have a set of policies and procedures that both the employees, business partners and clients are aware of and agree to beforehand. For example, use standardized contracts and forms to help limit potential contract disputes.
  • Have a good policy in place that addresses hiring and firing employees. Consult the Law Offices of Geoffrey D. Ittleman, P.A., to help draft policies that are applicable and abide by current employment laws.

Resolving Business Disputes

While some business disputes are unavoidable, others can be avoided through prevention.

Some small damage claims may be admissible to a small claims court, which is especially suitable for minor payment disputes. However, most business contracts have clauses that will require both parties to seek alternative dispute method resolutions before filing litigation, such as mediation or arbitration.

Arbitration is similar to a trial since both parties will argue their claims to an arbitrator, who analyzes the case and then recommends a solution.

Mediation is when a mediator works with both sides to find a compromise that will end the ongoing conflict. Unlike an arbitrator that decides the solution, a mediator is simply someone who attempts to help both sides find common ground to avoid litigation and settle out of court.

Experienced Business Dispute Attorney

The Law Offices of Geoffrey D. Ittleman has more than 16 years of experience handling a wide variety of business dispute claims. If you are facing a business dispute or need legal counsel or advice, contact us for a free case evaluation.